Category Archives: Medical Device

  • Autumnal vibes have landed at BTG Labs and along with football-watching, apple-picking, Halloween costume-planning we have an array of opportunities for you to interact with us and learn more about the Surface Analyst.

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  • In the diverse and ever-growing world of medical devices, particularly those involving polymeric tubing, it is always crucial, and not always easy, to test and definitively guarantee the adhesion of your bonds and coatings. In the pursuit of bringing solutions to adhesion issues, BTG Labs is proud to be participating in the third annual AMI Medical Tubing Conference where our Custom Applications Scientist and Research and Development Chemist, Elizabeth Kidd, will be presenting the paper “UTILIZING WATER CONTACT ANGLE MEASUREMENTS TO VALIDATE CHANGES IN POLYMERIC TUBING SURFACE CHEMISTRY” on Tuesday, October 2.

     

    Understanding and measuring the surface energy of your device is crucial to ensuring long lasting adhesion. This presentation will walk attendees through:

     

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  • Partnering with Plastics Technology, BTG Labs held a webinar about a topic that’s attracting a lot of attention.

    In the webinar you’ll learn about how blooming can be detrimental to adhesion when bonding, coating, painting and sealing and, in the cases of medical equipment failures, can be a tremendous risk. Dr. Giles Dillingham walks through strategies for detecting, controlling, and avoiding issues associated with blooming using methods like contact angle measurement.

    Go here to view the webinar!

  • solving surface adhesion in tight areas

    What do both of these statements about surface adhesion have in common?

    • “We need to measure surface quality of the teeth on a gear to make sure the coating stays on.”

     

    • “We need to make sure the coating on our tubing is uniform, but we can’t measure a curved surface with our current surface testing method.”

    The answer?

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  • Water break testing. Dyne pens. Goniometer. No method at all.

    The search for a reliable, repeatable, objective method (i.e. not based on opinion) for measuring surface readiness in manufacturing was a search all too common among our current customers, and these methods are the most commonly tried and (formerly) used among them.

    Achieving great adhesion in manufacturing comes down to surface preparation (we call it “Clean to a Number”) and optimal surface prep is the difference between an average product…and an industry-leading one.

    But getting there means having an objectively quantified understanding of the top 3 molecular layers of your material surface.

    Did we just say “top 3 molecular layers?”

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  • “We’re manufacturing catheters, but currently we don’t have a reliable way to prove to the FDA that our plasma treatment process is effective and in control”

    It’s no surprise that manufacturing in the medical world carries with it a unique level of responsibility.

    The comfort and safety of patients is directly related to the quality of products that come out of medical manufacturing operations, and the FDA mandates manufacturers meet strict validation standards in order to sell their products.

    So when a manufacturer’s only option is assuming their process is adequate, the outlook is cloudy at best…

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  • surface cleanliness measuringPerforming any kind of inspection on small parts can be difficult. When measuring for surface cleanliness, accessing small parts can be even more challenging, especially when measuring on the factory floor.

    With the Surface Analyst, measuring surface cleanliness on small parts has never been easier. This handheld instrument is fast, easy, accurate, and non-subjective allowing for precise measurements, right on the factory floor.

    With specialized measurement heads and a tether to allow access to small parts, manufacturers can verify surface readiness to bond, paint, clean, coat, print, or seal. The Surface Analyst optimizes manufacturing, repairs, and maintenance. …Read More

  • BTG Lab’s recently held another successful webinar. Hosted by Products Finishing and presented by Dr. Giles Dillingham, the webinar emphasized the importance of monitoring cleaning processes and explored different ways to measure surface cleanliness.

    In the webinar, Dr. Dillingham discusses measuring surface cleanliness as a way to quantify cleaning processes. By measuring the success of cleaning processes, manufacturers can determine the ideal solution for their application.

    Precisely evaluating cleaning processes with water contact angle is a fast, easy, accurate, quantitative to way to gain ensure consistency and precision on the factory floor.

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  • Challenges often arise when verifying critical surface processes on the factory floor when measuring hard to reach areas and varying angles. The Surface Analyst conquers those challenges with the unique ability to measure on vertical surfaces, which include assembled parts and hard to reach spots. This allows for easier surface analysis on the factory floor.

    This ability is possible because of patented Ballistic Deposition which deposits a pulsed stream of micro droplets with enough kinetic energy to overcome surface roughness and textures.

    A few examples of the Surface Analyst’s ability to measure on vertical surfaces on the factory floor:

    • Airplane wings prior to bonding, painting, and repair
    • Canopy of jet fighters after cleaning
    • Wind turbine blades prior to bonded repair
    • Silkscreen bottles post flame treatment
    • Ship hulls prior to painting and bonding
    • Interior of automobile headlights prior to application of anti-fog coating
    • Windshield bond lines prior to sealing
    • Class A paint surface for decals applications and reapplications
    • Measuring appliances after metal cleaning and prior to power coating

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  • Teflon is a household name that commonly invokes images of eggs sizzling on a skillet, spatulas flipping pancakes, or rice steaming in a pan.

    But, there is much more to this magical non-stick coating.

    Teflon, a brand name for PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene), prohibits food from sticking to pots and pans because of its hydrophobic properties.

    As a low-energy, fluorocarbon solid neither water nor water containing substances can influence the surface. This means that nothing will stick to the surface or penetrate it.

    Today, Teflon has improved culinary pursuits and made cooking more accessible, but that isn’t the only field PTFE has influenced.

    The medical device industry would not be what it is today without PTFE. As medical devices work intimately with the human body, they must be completely sanitary, inert, and harmless.

    With its lubriciousness and impenetrable properties, PTFE is used to coat a variety of medical devices such as catheters, surgical equipment, balloons, bladders, and implants.

    But, PTFE only works when the coating itself sticks to the surface. This requires proper surface preparation which can be challenging in any manufacturing floor. It’s especially difficult in medical device manufacturing as specifications are so high and there is no room for failure.    …Read More